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Copyright 1966, American Medical Association
Reprinted from JAMA 197:999-1005, 1966.

Educational Background of
Chiropractic School Faculties (1966)

Department of Investigation
American Medical Association

What type of educational background do faculty members at the schools of chiropractic have? In an attempt to check the claims, that such "faculties are made up of seasoned practitioners, young chiropractors with academic degrees in the subjects in which they teach and non-chiropractor specialists in the fields in which they are assigned" [1], catalogs were obtained from 13 schools of chiropractic in the United States and Canada. The 13 schools included all the "approved" schools of chiropractic in the United States. (The "approval" is by the two national chiropractic associations; none of the chiropractic schools is accredited by any recognized educational accrediting agency in the United States.)

Study Design

To base the study on current information available from the 13 schools, the most recent editions of their catalogs were requested. The section of each catalog listing the faculty members was reviewed, and figures were compiled on faculty members according to the listing of verifiable four-year academic or professional degrees or the absence of any recognized academic degrees. Where the educational institution granting an academic degree was named, that school was asked to confirm the degree and indicate the recipient's major course of study.

For the purposes of this study, a definition of "spurious" degrees was obtained from the Office of Education of the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. In "Academic Degrees," a publication of that Department, more than 2,400 academic degrees are listed. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) degree is listed under the heading "spurious." A "spurious" degree is defined by the Office of Education as one purporting to be a legitimate degree, duplicating those given by legitimate institutions, but granted by "diploma mills," or a degree not granted or offered by a legitimate institution, but unique to the granting institution.

Three of the 13 schools do not Est their faculties, and three others list the faculty members and their degrees but not the schools granting the degrees. This study is confined primarily to the seven chiropractic schools whose catalogs list the faculty members' degrees as well as the granting institutions. Correlation is made of the subjects taught by currently listed faculty members and the academic background of each where the catalog contains sufficient information to permit the comparison. Where a faculty member is listed as having attended an institution of higher education but no degree is indicated, that institution was not contacted for verification. For this study unconfirmed degrees include those in which the granting institution could find no record of the individual or the records indicated attendance but not graduation and those cases where no reply was received from a granting institution after a request for verification (considered doubtful).

The Survey**

The chiropractic schools included in the study are:

**The original JAMA article did not identify which data came from which schools, but it was possible to identify them through another source.

Survey Summary (1965 Statistics)

School

Students

Faculty

Faculty Listing Recognized Academic Degrees

Faculty Without Recognized Academic Degrees

Confirmed Degrees

Unconfirmed Degrees¦

DC Degrees

A  

19

4

15

NAÝ

NA

14

B

133*

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

C

164*

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

D

254

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

E

43

19

2

17

NA

NA

19

F

31

18

9

9

NA

NA

17

G

82

9

8

1

7

1

8

H

1,075*

29

8

21

8

0

27

I

239

23

8

15

6

2

21

J

192

23

14

9

13

1

17

K

211

44

25

19

16

12§

33

L

308

46

25

21

22

3

38

M

156

37

23

14

21

34

Totals

267

126

141

93

23

228

*1964-1965 statistics.
ÝNA = Not Applicable, either because faculty or granting institutions are not listed in catalog.
¦Includes degrees where no answer was received from granting institution and where granting institution is unaccredited.
§Some individuals may possess both confirmed and unconfirmed degrees.

Comment

It is submitted that this study proves the inadequacy of the quality of chiropractic school faculties as gained from information in their own school catalogs. It confirms a statement by the former director of education of the American Chiropractic Association, who said:

Too many instructors [in chiropractic schools are] teaching the basic sciences without having had any advanced or graduate training in these sciences. Too many instructors fare] not trained or qualified as teachers nor masters in their fields, resulting in slavish devotion to textbook teaching and instruction considerably below the level of postcollege professional education.

As seen from the table, more than 50% of the faculty members do not have recognized four-year academic degrees, and 23 of 126 recognized academic degrees listed by faculty members were not confirmed by the granting institutions. Also, 228 of the total of 267 faculty members listed the "spurious" DC degree.

It is not surprising, therefore, that no chiropractic school is accredited by any recognized educational accrediting agency in the United States.

Reference

1. Weiant, C. Letters to the Editor. Science 151:1170, 1966.

School: A ||| B ||| C ||| D ||| E ||| F ||| G ||| H ||| I ||| J ||| K ||| L ||| M
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This article was posted on August 4, 1999.